Unlocking Inner Depths: Psychodynamic Therapy for Anxiety Relief

Unlocking Inner Depths: Psychodynamic Therapy for Anxiety Relief

Are you tired of living in the grip of anxiety, constantly battling with your racing thoughts and overwhelming fears? If so, psychodynamic therapy may hold the key to unlocking inner depths and finding relief. This therapeutic approach delves into the unconscious mind, aiming to uncover unresolved conflicts and past traumas that are fueling your anxiety.

On Psychoanalysis and Horror

On Psychoanalysis and Horror

Richard Reinhardt

Apropos a recent article he co-authored with Leah Gipson titled “Against Diagnosing the Spirit: A Note on the Clinic of Spirit Possession,” and recently published in Penumbr(a), Depth Counseling clinician Richard Reinhardt discusses how, in the course of a psychoanalysis, that which once seemed horrifying might come to be welcomed as beautiful.

Depressive Personality Styles: an In-Depth Discussion

Depressive Personality Styles: an In-Depth Discussion

Kathryn Levison, BA

One of the most widely studied personality styles, no discourse on a depressive personality’s approach to coping with life can be all-inclusive. Even author and psychoanalyst Nancy McWilliams wrote twice as much on depression as all the other chapters in her reference text, Psychoanalytic Diagnosis. Therefore, while this writing is packed with information, the data on depression can be daunting. Still, Kathryn Levison strives to present the most apropos data along with plenty of resources and references for further exploration of depression and depressive personalities.

How to Decolonize Psychoanalysis

How to Decolonize Psychoanalysis

Micaiah Warren

Today, America is becoming more inclusive than it has ever been. In order to make room for diversity and inclusion, we must continue to restructure ourselves in order to adapt to a multiculturally focused environment. Author Micaiah Warren discusses perspectives and strategies that the practice of psychoanalysis and the psychological community at large can adopt to that end.

The Surprising Root of Manic Character Patterns

The Surprising Root of Manic Character Patterns

Kathryn Levison, BA

How can an upbeat person have a gloomy undercurrent to their otherwise personable nature? Why would someone who’s “always happy and productive” suddenly turn irritable but then shift back to their usual cheerful self? And who wouldn’t feel steamrollered and sad when someone or something dear to their heart is suddenly and unexpectedly stripped away? Drawing on psychoanalyst Nancy McWilliams’ theories, two classic concepts from Freud and Jung, and her own personal experiences, Kathryn Levison offers an answer that is both surprising and surprisingly logical.